Strange Foods Romans Enjoy You’ll be thankful for bat soup

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> Strange Foods Romans Enjoy You’ll be thankful for bat soup

Romans; It owns many innovations that are frequently used today, such as toilets, sewers, concrete structures, and extensive road systems. Oddly enough, they also pioneered some recipes that will make your stomach churn. In this article we have explained these seven recipes of the strangest Roman kitchens. We hope you don’t try these recipes at home!

Source: https://medium.com/lessons-from-histo…

1. Dolphin meatballs.

1. Dolphin meatballs.

The Romans liked to eat sea creatures because they saw them as luxury foods. According to Apicius’ recipe, these meatballs were made by skinning the dolphin and cutting the meat into small meatballs. The cooks then cooked the meatballs in wine, olive oil and a fish sauce known as garum. You might think of garum as a strange condiment, made by fermenting fish for weeks. Dolphin meatballs are a dish that attracts a lot of attention because today most of us prefer to see dolphins in the seas and rivers instead of seeing them on our plates. If you lived back then, would you try dolphin fish meatballs?

2. Sparrow tongue cake.

2. Sparrow tongue cake.

Like most of the wealthy today, the Roman elite were big fans of expensive, high-quality food. One of the most popular dishes was sparrow tongue pie, an ancient Roman tradition that had perhaps been worse than any other. How they can make cakes using the tongue of a small bird like a sparrow is a big topic of discussion! After all, we are not talking about a 1000 pound animal. A single cake was made with the tongues of at least a thousand sparrows captured by Roman slaves. First, they opened the bird’s beak, broke its neck and cut out its tongue. To make the cake, the chefs marinated and cooked sparrow tongues in red wine. Sparrow tongue cake was Apicius’ favorite dish. This cake had become Apicius’ signature.

3. Jellyfish omelette.

3. Jellyfish omelette.

Want some jellyfish on your omelette? The famous Roman cook Apicius had different recipes. We see from records that the Romans often ate jellyfish in salads. But Apicius, a culinary innovator, took slimy seafood recipes to the next level by making an omelet with jellyfish. The Romans were familiar with anchovy omelets. Apicius had the bad idea of ​​adding jellyfish to an omelette instead of anchovies. The recipe was known as patina de apua sin apua, which in Latin means tortilla without anchovies. Apicius’ cooks used jellyfish instead of anchovies in the omelette, and according to Apicius’ cookbook, “The guest eats what he finds and never notices.” he says What Apicius’ guests think of the jellyfish omelette is a great question.

4. Ferret brain for the treatment of epilepsy.

4. Ferret brain for the treatment of epilepsy.

Weasels were not a common tradition in ancient Rome. However, the Romans saw it as medicine. The Roman statesman Pliny the Elder had researched the unknown about ferret brains, which served as a cure for epilepsy. The animal’s liver or testicles, uterus or abdomen were removed with skewers. Pliny the Elder of Rome also thought that salted poppy flesh was beneficial for people bitten by snakes.

5. A dormouse meal stuffed with ground pork.

5. A dormouse meal stuffed with ground pork.

Dormouse stuffed with minced meat was a tradition among the Romans. Some customers offered this dish to their guests as a symbol of their wealth. The rulers of Rome emptied the entrails of rats, then stuffed them with ground pork and cooked them. During the holidays, the Romans served this dish mainly as an appetizer. Amazingly, the Dormouse Dish is still made today. Although not popular in Italy, it is still consumed among the peasant communities of Croatia and Slovenia. Eating dormice is something of a tradition in both countries. They fry mice over an open flame or heat them to make a goulash-like dish.

6. Parrot stew with special sauce.

6. Parrot stew with special sauce.

The Roman emperor Elagabalus was known for throwing great parties. Parrot was a popular dish at their parties. The Romans loved parrots because they could imitate what people said. The Romans thought it was funny to have parrots repeat the words of a heavy drinking guest. But when the jokes were over, they got into the pot with parrots, pheasants, peacocks and flamingos. There is a recipe for parrots and flamingos in Apicius’ cookbook. The birds were plucked and then boiled in a broth flavored with dill, salt, vinegar, leeks and coriander. After the birds were boiled, they were cooked in a sweet date sauce with salt, pepper, cumin and herbs. It actually looks like a pretty good recipe, but it would make more sense to try this special recipe with chicken.

7. Roast pork belly.

7. Roast pork belly.

Perhaps the least surprising of the list of strange foods the Romans ate is pig’s belly. You can see pork belly sold in Asian food stores in North America and eaten in Southeast Asia, so this dish doesn’t surprise me that much. The Romans considered this dish a tradition. To control the pig population, the Romans sterilized sows, and their bellies were carefully selected and preserved for delicious meals. So how did Roman leaders prepare a pig’s uterus? According to Apicius’ cookbook, he told us to cook the uterus in a broth with pepper, celery seed, dried mint, and licorice root. Licorice is a mysterious ingredient found in many Roman recipes. Another way to prepare the pork uterus was to grill it. The cooks grilled the uterus, sautéed it, and then fried it over an open fire. How delicious do you think it is?

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